My co-op experience

By Jane Vaughan

I did my Co-op in a secondary school just outside of Limerick City and it was the best six months of work ever. For many co-op is the first real experience of the working world, the first opportunity to prove yourself and show that you are capable of many things.

Co-op allows you to work in pretty much any field you like for Arts and Humanities students. The university can organise where and who you work for if you want them to or else you can organise it yourself. I organised it myself as it is a much faster process because the college have an enormous amount of other placements to organise each year.

To organise your own, you send out your CV to the places that you’d be interested in working for and then you might get called for an interview and you continue this process until you have secured a placement. If you do have UL getting you your placement it’s important to know that you have to accept the first job offer you get. Some Co-op placements are also not permitted to pay you. Because mine was a secondary school they did not have to pay me.

You learn so many valuable skills while on co-op such as, time management, people skills and teamwork skills. You get to experience a real working environment and all the pros and cons that come with it.

While Co-op is a break from college work for six months it does means you have to fill out a report at the end of it all. I’d suggest you begin this early enough and add in points as you go on in your placement because if you leave it until the week before it’s due it will become awfully painful.

The best piece of advice I could give you for your co-op is choose some place you’d really like to work in and not the place that is easiest to secure.

 

janevaughan

Jane Vaughan is in her fourth year studying English and History at the University of Limerick. She is 22 and from Limerick. You can read her personal blog here  and follow her on Twitter at @_PaulaJane

 

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My time studying in UL

By Jane Vaughan

I am a fourth year student here at The University of Limerick and I’m studying English and History.

The modules for history are quite diverse which is great because it means you get to study history from different parts of the globe. Sometimes studying these two subjects together is an advantage because they can overlap, especially with Irish Literature and Irish History.

I knew from about third year of secondary school that these two subjects were what I wanted to go on and study in college. English was my best subject in school all the way up through school and history was something I didn’t have to work on until fifth year. At the start of sixth year I wanted to attend UCC but later changed that because why would I go to a different county when I had an unreal college just forty minutes in the road from me?

The key to a good college life is balance and time management. You need to spend the right amount of time getting your work done and also having the bit of craic. (Disclaimer: There will always be things you need to do, but as long as you keep on top of things you’ll be fine.)

There are loads of places around campus where you can go and relax for an hour before your next lecture, The Library Cafe, The Stables, Red Raisins and The Paddocks to name but a few. (The women who work in the Library Cafe are just the best and not only make you a great chicken roll but call you ‘pet’ and ‘hun’ to make you feel extra special.)

UL campus is like a little town itself and to be honest, I’m still finding new parts of it going into my final year, but don’t let that worry you there are so many people willing to help new students here, The First Seven Weeks program offers additional help to UL’s new students by having fellow students stationed around the campus with the aim of helping you find your way around or answering any questions you may have.

Give it three weeks and you’ll be well and truly settled into your new home here at Limerick.

janevaughan

Jane Vaughan is in her fourth year studying English and History at the University of Limerick. She is 22 and from Limerick. You can read her personal blog here  and follow her on Twitter at @_PaulaJane

 

Making friends at University

By Jane Vaughan

 Making friends at college was probably one of my biggest worries coming into to college. I was so nervous walking in by the flag poles on the day of orientation but looking back I need not have worried.

The key thing about making friends is in your orientation group, this group is filled with about 10/15 people who are all in your course, you spend the day being shown the campus together by your guide. I met some of my best friends on orientation day. After the day was finished we all exchanged numbers and decided on a place to meet on the following Monday, for our first day of college. We were all afraid of getting lost but once you’re in a group at least if you get lost, you all get lost together.

Being a part of two very popular subjects can make it had to find out who is actually is your course so me and two of my friends (from my orientation group) decided to make a Facebook group for our course and one by one we eventually began to know who was in our course. Year by year you get a lot more closer to those in your course.

Tutorial groups are also a very good way of making friends as a lot of the time you get put into even smaller groups for team work. You are meant to go to the same tutorial group every week so it’s no harm in befriending people so ye can all help each other out with readings and work.

If you are willing to make friends in college you will have no problem doing so as everyone else around you wants to do the same thing.

janevaughan

Jane Vaughan is in her fourth year studying English and History at the University of Limerick. She is 22 and from Limerick. You can read her personal blog here  and follow her on Twitter at @_PaulaJane. Here she talks about making friends at UL.