Why You Shouldn’t Worry If You’re Going Into College Alone

By Sarah Talty, 4th year Journalism and New Media


There were roughly 1,200 students in my year at secondary school and only about 16 of us went to the University of Limerick.

None of my friends were going to UL and anybody I did vaguely know going to UL was commuting. Essentially I was starting over at UL alone. My dad reminded me that I was as nervous going into primary school where I knew nobody at all and I was fine. Then again he reminisced I was nervous going into secondary school alone too, when all of my other friends went to another all girls secondary school in town and I was fine. I reassured myself with the thought that I had made a lot of great friends on both occasions but it didn’t stop me from feeling any less nervous.

My poor mother. I was so incredibly nervous going to UL, to move into my new Plassey house full of strangers, that I did not speak to her the entire car journey. Any attempts at conversation were met with a tight-lipped grunt. She drove me into the car park in the middle of Plassey Village where my little house was located. Students were already walking around in pairs and groups and I felt utterly alone. I looked up at the windows of my house ablaze with light, indicating some of my housemates were already there. I had dropped off most of my things a few days ago with my parents and sister in tow. We met two other girls who were living with me who were lovely but also best friends from home. I knew they wouldn’t be down that night anyways, they had told me that. Suddenly I couldn’t talk to my mother enough, I just wanted to stay in that car

I need not have worried. I tentatively opened the door to my house and a tall boy appeared before me. He informed me he was one of my housemates and they were all going to Stables and I had to join them. No I couldn’t, I told him. I wasn’t really planning on going out with orientation the next day, I had nothing to drink or to wear, but my excuses fell on deaf ears and I was swept upstairs to my room. I met a new housemate, a girl this time, who promptly lent me shoes and swapped makeup tips. Some of my nerves dissolved as I was swept up into the giddy excitement at my first taste of proper freedom. My parents never would have allowed me to go out when I had something as important at orientation at 9am the next morning. But I was in college and all of my decisions, good and bad, were now my own.

Over the next few days, through housemates and orientation and nights out and meeting all the kind, interesting people in my course, I made lots of friends. Just like my dad knew I would.

Bottom line is please don’t worry if you’re going to college alone. Okay I won’t tell you not to worry because of course you will, just as I did. I will tell you just know that you will be fine and standing on your own two feet and starting fresh and having to lean how to make new friends just like you did when you were 5 and 12 is just as exciting and rewarding at 18. Hopefully you will make as an amazing and solid group of friends as I did and can count them as friends for years to come.


Why I choose to study at the University Limerick

By Aine O’Neill

The University of Limerick: I chose this university for multiple reasons. The sports, courses, and location are just a few reasons why I found UL to be the place for me. The high-quality facilities and easy going atmosphere have made it possible for me to excel in a place that doesn’t seem quite so scary.

The main reason I chose here, was the numerous amounts of co-op which you get to experience not only helps you decide on your future path and instill a fire for the course you chose but also is useful for employment opportunities in the future. The courses when you look at them as a sixth year student are diverse so you don’t feel as if you are confined to the tittle of the course, the sheer amount of electives allow you to shape your degree and follow your genuine passion. This is a major deciding factor as you are constantly changing with the varying changes in your personal tastes.



I chose University of Limerick due to its tranquil location, you are away from the bustling city lights and I knew I would have a sense of security within the UL grounds, the campus itself is hard not to fall in love with and when I was browsing places to go for college it stood out as one of the most memorably beautiful places, from the living bridge to Plassey house you cannot help but admire UL for its natural beauty.

The sports aspect of things is somewhat of a foreign aspect to me, or so it was until I went to UL. I never realised upon arrival the type of sport orientated campus which it was even me, the laziest person cannot help but be influenced by the giant UL gym which towers over Kilmurry village. I also chose UL as unlike places such as Dublin which have a housing crisis, UL has copious amounts of villages at your disposal which are spacious and have friendly staff in them.

In conclusion I chose University of Limerick for its diverse courses, friendly atmosphere and vast opportunities which is at your doorstep, it proves everyday why UL is a place I now consider home.


Aine O’Neill is a 1st year English and History student at the University of Limerick.

Why choose UL?

By Ciara Larkin

For those of you who are still in secondary school, and are considering coming to UL in September, I can’t encourage you enough. Being from Limerick (but really from Clare), I wasn’t too eager or excited to come to UL because it was so close to home, but I don’t regret my decision for a second. UL is without a doubt the best university in Ireland. It has such a beautiful campus, a diverse variety of Clubs and Socs, a great student support system and an extremely friendly atmosphere – no matter where on campus you are. Because UL is the youngest University in Ireland it’s also the most modern. This applies not only to the architecture and the courses available, but also to the vibe around the college. The lecturers in UL are all down to earth, and the relationship between lecturers and students like that of peers. Although UL has more than 13,000 students, every single one of those students is a part of the UL family. You’d be hard pressed to find anyone in UL who didn’t feel at home.

If you’ve been at UL Open Day, you’ve experienced just how great UL can be, and hopefully we’ll see your face next September!

Hot Air Balloon at this years Open Day

Co – op:

As I said I’m on co-op at the moment, and although it’s great to have a break from studying and stressing about exams, it’s also kind of scary being out in the real world. I was working in a law firm during the summer, but I’m lucky enough to be back on UL turf again working as the PVA Administrator. The co-op programme in UL is honestly one of the best things about the university. I know that it causes anyone who doesn’t have a QCA of 4.0 a crazy amount of anxiety, but my advice would be not to stress, because it all falls into place.


I’ll be heading on Erasmus in January, to Radboud University in the Netherlands. Despite having lived in the Holland until I was 3, and downloading Duolingo, the extent of my Dutch is “De meisjes lezen de krant” which means “the girls read the newspaper” – an expression I’m sure I will use daily come January. I plan on writing plenty of posts while I’m there, so if you’re thinking of going on Erasmus, stay tuned to this blog to get the inside scoop.

Anyway, that’s it from me, keep an eye on the blog for more posts from my fellow ambassadors.

profoHiya! I’m Ciara, and I’m a Law Plus Student at the University of Limerick. I’m in third year, and I’ve been on co-op since the start of the summer. This blog is just so you can get to know me a little better, but stay tuned for some more interesting ones about my life as a UL student! I’m from a small village in Clare but I tell everyone I’m from Limerick because I went to school there, and that’s sometimes too much for people’s brains to handle. I am a huge fan of Lana Del Rey and cheese, and my talents include watching entire seasons of series in less than 24 hours, sleeping through the 20 alarms I set every morning, and eating excessive amounts of cheese. In my spare time I volunteer, sing, go online shopping for things I’ll never be able to afford, and I eat cheese…